Pages For Salvador Bahia Brasil Resources for Travel in Brazil

Monday

US Consulate In Brazil | Salvador Consular Agency

Complete and thorough information on the US Consulate in Brazil located in Salvador, Bahia Brasil
US Consulate in Brazil located in Salvador Bahia Brasil

US Consulate in Brazil located in Salvador, Bahia Brasil

The US Consulate in Brazil located in Salvador da Bahia operates by appointment only, except for emergency services. Emergencies include - death, arrest, stolen or lost passports. You can schedule your appointment by sending an email to the email address below. By scheduling your appointment through email, we can provide more efficient service to the public and you have more flexibility in scheduling your appointment time. Appointment requests via phone are not accepted. Please note that there is no fee to schedule an appointment.

Please arrive in the section 15 minutes prior to your appointment time.

Services requiring email appointments:
  • U.S. Passport Services
  • U.S. Citizenship & Report of Birth Abroad
  • Notary and Other Services
To schedule an appointment, please email: amcon99@terra.com.br, Heather Marques U.S. Consular
OR
American Citizen’s Services e-mail: acs1salvador@gmail.com which the Consular Assistant opens every day.

US Consulate in Brazil | Bahia Brasil Consular Office

 The U.S. Consulate in Rio de Janeiro maintains a Consular Agency in Salvador to provide the services above described to all American Citizens located in the area of Bahia state.

Thursday

When Monkeys Attack | Info on Brazil Wildlife | Monkeys in Brazil

You know how sometimes you are walking down the street and you see a pack of micos everywhere?  Especially when someone has bananas or some other fruit that is about to go bad and they sit it out for the monkeys instead of throwing it away.

It happens like this:
1st Someone leaves some fruit out and a few monkeys come down from the trees to devour it.
monkeys in brazil filmed in salvador bahia brasil
just in case don't know what a mico is...here they are


2nd A couple more show up...
brazil wildlife snapshot micos eating bananas in bahia brasil


3rd Before you know it like 20 of these little guys show up to join the feast!
monkeys in brazil on film salvador bahia brasil
they started to realize they were being filmed


We have had some fruit bandits before in the past.  I set out a mango that wasn't even ripe and they gobbled it up.  Micos are gangster!  The seed was still spinning in the air.

Here's a little background info on the micos:

According to Wikipedia, "Brazil has the largest mammal diversity in the world, with more than 600 described species and, probably, many yet to be discovered... Mico is a genus of New World monkeys of the family Callitrichidae, the family containing marmosets and tamarins."

I was looking up Brazil wildlife online to see what the experts at Wikipedia had to say about monkeys in Brazil, particular these little guys that we see all the time.  They didn't list any mico species as having their habitat in the state of Bahia but obviously noone has informed these monkeys.

They can be found all over the place, pretty much anywhere you find trees, you will find monkeys.  I remember the 1st time we visited the zoo there were more monkeys out rooming freely in the area around the zoo than there were inside the zoo exhibit.

So back to the micos...
These guys run the airwaves too.  You can pretty much assume that they are overhead watching you if there are any trees nearby.  They use the telephone wires and electric wires to travel throughout the city.

I realized this one day when I looked up and saw one monkey in a tree.  I took a closer look and realized there was at least 7 in that tree.  After that I noticed them everywhere.  They were in all the trees and walking along the wires overhead.  It was crazy.  I never noticed them like that before.  Sometimes I might see one or two but they were and always are all over the place.


Hope you enjoy that short video of the urban wildlife here is Bahia.

Micos are one of several types of macocos (monkeys) found in Brazil.  You can even buy them (ahem, illegally) on the street in some feiras (markets).

Monday

Orishá Statues at Dique Do Tororo | Orixás Candomble in Bahia Brasil



The orishá live in Bahia, Brasil. They are alive and well. This is especially evident in Salvador, the state capital of Bahia. Depictions of the orishá (orixás alt. spelling), are found in the various ruas (streets) and plazas of Salvador, Bahia, Brasil. They are literally visible throughout the city.  The Orishá are the deities of the Afro-Brazilian religion Candomble.

Orishá Statues at Dique Do Tororo | Orixás Candomble in Bahia Brasil
One example is the painted mermaid statue in the neighborhood of Rio Vermelho associated with Yemanja, mother goddess figure, which overlooks the sea. Another example is the statue of Exu, the orishá who manages all types of communication and guardian of the crossroads, which is located, fittingly, in front of Salvador’s central correiro (post office).

impressive orishá statues of candomble at dique do tororo
One of the most impressive depictions of the orishá, however, is located on a big lake and recreation park in the middle of the city called Dique do Tororo, which contains a group of orishá statues dancing in a circle on the surface of the water. Dique do Tororo looks just as impressive as it sounds.
boat tour of the orixás candomble at dique do tororo

Throughout this article you will see photos taken by my wife while visiting Dique do Tororo with a friend. She took a boat tour that is available daily for only $20 reais. We definitely recommend the boat tour for anyone visiting Bahia, Brasil. Be sure to check out our Bahia Tour site to schedule any tours in Bahia.


First let’s talk a little about "The Most African City of Brazil", Salvador, Bahia.

Thursday

FOOD FROM BRAZIL: MOORISH INFLUENCE

The food from Brazil is just as interesting and diverse as the people and landscape of this thriving melting pot.  There has been heavy influence from the various immigrants to the country as well as the indigenous population.

food from brazil


This post will focus on the heavy Moorish influence on Brazilian cuisine coming from an interesting mix of Portugal, African slaves, and Arab immigrants.  Portugal at the time of the colonization of Brazil was a nation recovering from a lengthy period of Moorish occupation. Many of the colonist were Christianized Moors, or moriscos.  Also, a little known fact is that Brazil has the largest Arab population outside of the Middle East.

The Moorish Influence on Food From Brazil


The Moorish influenced remained in Portuguese culture as evident in the cuisine and language.  Many Portuguese words have Arabic roots such as orange (laranja in Portuguese; from the Arabic naranj نارنج) and rice (arroz in Portuguese; from the Arabic al-ruzz).  Both rice and oranges were brought to Spain and Portugal by the Moors.

The Arab influence is so deeply embedded in to Brazilian culture that most do not realize how prevalent it is. It has just been integrated as Brazilian.  In the main Brazilian cities it is easy to find restaurants that cook Arabic food such as sfihas (Portuguese esfirra), tabbouleh (Portuguese tabule), kibbeh (Portuguese quibe), hummus, tahina and halwa are very well known among Brazilians.

Brazilian mainstays such as cuscuz arrived via African slaves.  Cuscuz is a popular dish in Bahia, Brasil.
Couscous is actually the national dish of Morocco.  The term Cuscuz, also spelled cuscus and cuzcuz in Portuguese, refers to several preparations in different regions of the country. The origin of the plate is certainly the Middle Eastern couscous, but once it was introduced to the new tropical culture, several versions using local ingredients began to develop.
cuscuz food from brazil

cuscuzeira bahia brasilIn Bahia, Brasil Cuscuz can be a plain, steamed, cake-like cereal made with flocos de milho pré-cozidos (yellow, precooked corn meal - “Milharina”, by Quaker, is a very well known brand). Usually served for breakfast, it’s made in the cuscuzeira, or cuscuzeiro (see picture), a steaming pan that has a perforated metal disc with a handle that seats on top of simmering water where you place the corn meal, previously moistened with salt water.
cuscuz de tapioca in bahia brasil 
Then, there’s cuscuz de tapioca, a sweet, flan-like version of the dish made with manioc/yucca tapioca pearls, coconut and condensed milk.  Source




kibe with hummus food from brazil 






kibe arabic food from brazil Kibe/Quibe: extremely popular, it corresponds to the Lebanese dish kibbeh and was brought to mainstream Brazilian culture by Syrian and Lebanese immigrants. It can be served baked, fried, or raw.  It is stuffed with meat or hummus.
esfiha arabic food from brazil 



Esfiha (Arabic: sfiha): another Middle Eastern dish, despite being a more recent addition to Brazilian cuisine they are nowadays easily found everywhere, specially in Northeastern, Southern and Southeastern regions. They are pie/cakes with fillings like beef, mutton, cheese curd, or seasoned vegetables.



tabouli food from brazil arabic
Tabouli is another fixture at salad bars.

West African Flavor of Food From Brazil


The African hand in the Brazilian cooking pot completes the triptych, most noticeably in the northeastern states, where the plantation system held greatest sway. There, from virtually the inception of colonization, Africans were in control of the kitchens of the Big Houses. In Bahia, Brasil they were from the Bight of Benin and the Sudanese regions of West Africa. In Rio and Pernambuco, they were mainly Bantu. All brought their own tastes in food.
baiana cooking bahia brasil influence
This baiana in Bahia, Brasil is preparing acaraje and has cuscuz as well as cuscuz de tapioca

food from brazil acaraje from bahia brasil
Acaraje, the Brazilian falafel
The religious traditions of the African continent crossed the Atlantic as well, and in the hands of the Big House cooks, many ritual dishes were secularized and joined the culinary repertoire. The akara, a bean fritter fried in palm oil by the Yoruba people of southwestern Nigeria, was transformed into the Brazilian black-eyed pea fritter, or acaraje; fon akassa changed only its spelling to become the acaca, and the Angolan cornmeal porridge known as funji kept its name and its spelling as the dishes of the African continent were turned into Brazilian standbys.


African cooks embellished dishes with ginger, chilies, and pulverized cashew nuts and maintained the tastes of coastal Africa in the continued use of dried smoked shrimp and palm oil. They adapted recipes and adopted the ingredients of the new land to create a cooking so unique that the food of the state of Bahia is considered by many the linchpin that connects the cooking of Africa with that of the Western Hemisphere.
Source
food of Bahia Brasil


Check out the article below from Islamictourism.com:

Food From Brazilian with an Arab touch

Islamic Tourism – Issue 34 – March-April / 2008

By  Habeeb Salloum

In the world of culinary art, Brazil is to Portugal what Mexico is to Spain. These two colonies
in the New World were the crown jewels of their respective motherland. However, in their
cuisines, both carrying deep Arab influences, there is a difference.

Even though many of the original colonists in both countries were Moors newly converted to Christianity, in Brazil, a huge number of African slaves were imported to work on the plantations. A good number were Muslims and their food was saturated with North African influences. The 20th century Arab immigrants to the country added another dimension to Brazilian food. Hence, the Moorish heritage of the Portuguese

Carnival Salvador Dates From 2013 To 2030


carnival salvador bahia brasil incredible street party
When are the official Carnival dates?  This was created to provide a schedule for anyone planning on visiting Bahia, Brasil now or in the future.  Carnival dates change every year. 
Be sure to bookmark this page.

Usually Carnival starts a day before the "official" start.  Also festivities leading up to Carnival Salvador start in late December.  Be sure to click the link below to schedule your Carnival trip.

Check the Dates Out For Info About Carnival Salvador, Rio, and the Rest of Brazil



Carnival Salvador 2013 dates: February 8th until February 12th
Carnival Salvador 2014 dates: February 28th until March 4th
Carnival Salvador 2015 dates: February 13th until February 17th
Carnival Salvador 2016 dates: February 5th until February 9th
Carnival Salvador 2017 dates: February 24th until February 28th
Carnival Salvador 2018 dates: February 9th until February 13th
Carnival Salvador 2019 dates: March 1rd until March 5th
Carnival Salvador 2020 dates: February 21st until February 25th
Carnival Salvador 2021 dates: February 12th until February 16th
Carnival Salvador 2022 dates: February 25th until March 1st
Carnival Salvador 2023 dates: February 17th until February 21st
Carnival Salvador 2024 dates: February 9th until February 13th
Carnival Salvador 2025 dates: February 28th until March 4th
Carnival Salvador 2026 dates: February 13th until February 17th
Carnival Salvador 2027 dates: February 5th until February 9th
Carnival Salvador 2028 dates: February 25th until February 29th
Carnival Salvador 2029 dates: February 9th until February 13th
Carnival Salvador 2030 dates: March 1st until March 5th

Now that you have all the dates, you are able to start arranging your bookings for the next must-see Carnival!

Tuesday

HOW TO CASH AN INTERNATIONAL CHECK: TRAVEL IN BRAZIL EXPAT INFORMATION


how to cash an international check, brazil expat and travel to brazil advice

Great info on how to cash an international check for a Brazil expat, people planning to travel to Brazil, or just looking for Brazil information in general.  Here’s what to do if you get paid in a foreign currency and you live or travel in Brazil.

 How to Cash an International Check the Hard Way


travel to brazil, cambio foreign exchange in bahia brasil
As for me, I learned the hard way but I use my blog here to share my experience with all you great readers out there so that you don’t have to make the same mistakes I did.  I didn’t think cashing an international check would be a big deal since I have more than one Brazilian bank account.  I even have a corporate account with the central bank here (Banco do Brasil) so I figured this would be an easy thing to do.

Boy was I wrong!

I make money online and one of my payment methods is through ClickBank (yes ClickBank really pays out!).  With a US bank account you can just get direct deposit, no worries.  However if you receive physical checks in the mail in Brazil, like I did then cashing the check becomes a little more tricky.  I first attempted to cash the international check at one of my personal Brazilian bank accounts with Banco Itau.  That did not work.  I couldn’t even deposit the check!  Noone seemed to have any idea what to do.  One of the employees had a senior bank manager come to help me.

I was told to try the mesa do cambio (foreign exchange desk) at the main bank for Itau in the commercial district.  I went all the way to the other side of town to no avail.  They were not able to cash my international check or deposit it into my checking account.  I left feeling disappointed but not before getting the runaround from bank employees.  They told me that Banco do Brasil down the street would be able to do it com certeza (with certainty).

I then went to Banco do Brasil thinking they could handle the transaction but was told by an employee that I would need to go to the branch located on the other side of town (closer to my house).  Before I went to the other bank location I tried at least 8 different foreign exchange shops.  None of them could cash my check.

I finally went to the other Banco do Brasil closer to my house and was again told that they could not cash my international check.  However I was told that they could deposit the check.  The wait for the check to clear could take a month or more though because they have to mail the check to the US and wait for it to clear and be returned (or something along those lines).  The bank employee who I spoke with was very helpful though because he actually sent me to the place that was able to cash my international check!

Take notes, because this type of banking Brazil information could prove invaluable to any Brazil expat or people looking to travel in Brazil.  How to cash an international check in Brazil was like the million dollar question that day for me.  I asked nearly a hundred people and only one knew the answer.  These weren’t just random people off the street either, I was talking to bank employees and people who exchange foreign currencies every day (cambios) and nobody knew the answer.

How to Cash an International Check the Easy Way

Brazil expat information and advice on how to cash an international check, Confidence Cambio in bahia brasilSo the place I went to cash my Clickbank check (drumroll please) was a loja (store) called Confidence Câmbio.  That’s it!  That is how you cash an international check in Brazil.  As far as I know of Confidence is the only place that will do this.  You can also go there to exchange cash as well.

The one I went to was in Salvador, Bahia – Brasil.  It was in a small shopping center at the bottom of a skyscraper called "ondonto" something…  I think it was filled with dentists’ offices.  The neighborhood it was in is called Itagaira.

How lucky was I to finally talk to the banker at the last branch I visited who pointed me in the right direction?  I don’t really believe in luck or chance.  In actuality my first thought was to go to that bank before I spent a whole day and a half searching around the city for a place to cash my check.

If I would have listened to my inner voice I would have saved myself a lot of hassle but eventually I came around and the answer to my predicament found me.

I think things have changed recently with Confidence though.  I was able to take my checks to them and get them cashed right there on the spot.  It usually took about 30 minutes or so for the check to clear and then they would cash it for me.  Things went a little differently the last time I went though.  Instead of cashing my checks they took my checking account info so they could deposit the money straight into my account.  They said that they stopped giving cash on the spot for the checks.

It took a while almost two weeks for the transaction to go through.  Also, you may be required to have a Brazilian bank account now.  I’m not sure because I used my Brazilian checking account.

That’s my experience if anyone knows any differently or has any questions feel free to comment below.

Sharif

Thursday

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

Be Sure To "Like" Us On Facebook!
www.facebook.com/MoorAboutBahia

afro brazilian like moor about bahia brasil

Guide of Salvador, Bahia - Brasil. Info on Carnival Salvador, doing business in Brasil, travel in Brazil, the economy of Brazil as well as being black in Brazil.  Bahia is seen as the "Soul of Brazil" and heart of Afro Brazilian culture. 

YOUR BUSINESS GUIDE TO BRAZIL: TRADE MISSION

"Your Business Guide to Brazil"
Trade Mission

Thursday, Thursday 1, 2012 to Monday, November 12, 2012
Going Rio Janeiro and Salvador, Bahia Brazil

The trade mission is for American investors, business owners, and government officials looking to do business in Brazil, currently the 6th largest economy in the world!

business in bahia brasil trade mission

  •  Connect with local, state and federal government officials in Rio Janeiro and Salvador, Bahia
  •  Secure contracts with potential business partners in the private-sector within your industry
  •  Invest in workforce training and education, and visit local universities
  •  Participate in business matchmaking seminars and special events with other business colleagues
  •  Position your business for the World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics in 2016
  •  Take advantage of membership with the Partners of the Americas and other international organizations.
Your membership, customized trip itinerary, airfare cost, airport transfers and taxes, hotel accommodations, breakfast and lunch, transportation to/from meetings, and language translation are all provided.

Hosted by Partners of the Americas, Ebony Suns Enterprises, LLC, EOSS Consulting, and Ethnic Media Institute





For More Info
Contact Russell Hicks at (267)872-6636 or via e-mail at ebonysuns@gmail.com for more information. Register with half deposits by July 1, 2012. The remaining balance is due by September 15, 2012


HOW TO CALL IN BRAZIL (LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL)

phone call in brazil

 

Dialing Instructions

Brazil City Codes for Customers Dialing From Brazil

Local Calls While in Brazil (Vivo's network) to a Landline or Cellular Number:
Dial the local subscriber's number (7 or 8-digit length).

To Call US while in Brazil: 00 + Long Distance Provider Code (15) + 1 + 123-456-7890.

National Calls While in Brazil (Vivo's network):

0 + long distance code + area code + telephone number (e.g. 0 + LD + 2-digit area code + 7 or 8-digit telephone number).

International Call While in Brazil (Vivo's network) to Another International Destination:
00 + long distance code + country code + national destination code +telephone number (e.g. 00 + LD + variable length CC + variable lengthNDC + variable length telephone number).

Emergency Number While in Brazil:
190 (Police) and 193 (Fire station).

AFRO BRAZILIAN HERITAGE TOURISM IN BAHIA FREE PUBLICATION

salvador bahia brasil, afro brazilian woman in bahia
I recommend this online book to anyone with interest in Brazil, in particular the state of Bahia. This is a great publication in English with beautiful pictures and descriptions of Bahia.  It is a great read, whether you make the trip to Bahia, Brasil or not you will have a thorough understanding of the beautiful culture of this mystical place.  Filled with great info and pictures on Salvador, Bahia and this Mecca of Afro Brazilian culture.


afro brazilian culture parade in bahia


This is a publication from the Secretary of Tourism for the State of Bahia in Brasil.

Visit us at Bahia Brasil Tours


olodum school drum practice in bahia brasil

Sunday

BUSINESS IN BRASIL: IT TOOK 3 MINUTES TO SELL TRUMP ON BRAZIL

Trump Women of Brazil learn moor about bahia brasil

This piece contains two stories.  One is obviously about the potential investing in South America, in particular in Brasil.  The other shows how persaverance and believing in yourself can pay off big time.  Business in Brasil is booming and everyone wants a piece of the action.

Much like Brazilian girls, Brazilian property is steaming hot and has been for some time now.  Brasil has definitely become the hottest emerging property market in Latin America, having just received what during the boom came to be known as the emerging market seal-of-approval, investment by Donald Trump and the well known Trump Organization.


An example of this seal of approval is Panama, during the boom Panama’s construction boom was the hottest in Latin America, and the world, at which point Trump graced it with a Trump Tower, a massive multi-purpose (commercial, luxury-residential, hotel, condos, casino(s)) sky-scraper in Panama City, which we have all no-doubt heard about.

Tuesday

BAIA DE CAMAMU: PARADISE IN SOUTHERN BAHIA

paradise south of salvador bahia
Gorgeous and peaceful, Baía de Camamu, on the coast of the state of Bahia, Brasil is a place in which to bathe in the sea, relax and taste some lobster or shrimp. A refuge that fortunately remains protected.

André Silva, special for ANBA*

bahia brasil camamu paradise
source: www.1000dias.com
Camamu – A narrow strip of sand that seems like it may be submersed any second, marks the meeting between Baía de Camamu’s (Camamu Bay) peaceful waters and the stronger waves of the Atlantic Ocean. A framework of wood and straw beams is the only sign of human occupation at Coroa Vermelha (Portuguese for Red Crown), as the bay’s locals dubbed this sand strip. This desolate small island, a good spot to take a swim in the sea, bears witness to one of the main attractions of Camamu’s: the resistance of beaches, groves and islands in this Southern Bahia refuge to human occupation.


Coroa Vermelha could look altogether different. The locals explain how the island was purchased years ago by a famous singer in an axé music group (a typical local rhythm) who tried to build a mansion there. The

BRAZILIAN BIKINIS GETTING BIGGER TO FIT GROWING WAISTLINES

women of brazil, afro brazilian women on the beach in rio
In this photo Elisangela Inez Soares rinses off at a shower in Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  According to Soares "not everyone is built like a model."

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Tall and tan and young and ... chunky?

The Girl From Ipanema has put on a few pounds, and for many sunbathers on Brazil's beaches the country's iconic itsy-bitsy, teeny-weeny bikini just doesn't suffice anymore.

A growing number of bikini manufacturers have woken up to Brazil's thickening waistline and are reaching out to the ever-expanding ranks of heavy women with new plus-size lines.

That's nothing short of a revolution in this most body-conscious of nations, where overweight ladies long had little choice but to hit the beach in comely ensembles of oversized T-shirts and biker shorts.
brazil beauty learn moor about bahia brasil
Barbara Monteiro, Miss Brazil Plus Size 2011

"It used to be bikinis were only in tiny sizes that only skinny girls could fit into. But not everyone is built like a model," said Elisangela Inez Soares as she sunbathed on Copacabana beach, her oiled-up curves packed into a black size 12 bikini.

"Finally, it seems like people are beginning to realize that we're not all Gisele," said the 38-year-old mother of four, referring to willowy Brazilian supermodel Gisele Bundchen.

Clothing designer Clarice Rebelatto said her own swimwear-hunting travails prompted her to found Lehona, an exclusively plus-size beachwear line.

"Honestly, the problem went way beyond just bikinis. In Brazil, it used to be that if you were even a little chunky, finding any kind of clothes in the right size was a real problem," said Rebelatto, herself a size 10.

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